Wednesday, June 6, 2012

WHEAT BELLY



About three years ago, I was the most physically fit I had ever been. I was running almost every day, lifting weights and eating very well. My muscles began to show and my body fat reduced. You can imagine how puzzling it was for me to be burdened with a most uncomfortable, bloated lower abdomen. I literally felt like a small balloon had been blown up inside of me! 


Wearing jeans was awful because of the the pressure on my little pot belly; the tight dresses I adored didn't look as good on me as they used to. That bump would stick out no matter how I tried to suck it in! My arms and legs were looking great, my abs were tight, but no amount of cardio or sit-ups would reduce that little belly. And sometimes it would grow! Despite having gained no weight and eating goddamn well, my stomach would grow and grow on its own. There was no way of knowing whether I could comfortably wear the same outfit I had sported a few days earlier. Frustration doesn't even begin to describe the way I felt.


Fast forward a couple of years and I felt like I was forced to accept my belly issue. I had developed some theories about my pot belly that I wasn't totally convinced by. They included:


-I was experiencing a natural slowdown in metabolism; 
-I had irritable bowel syndrome
-My body was clinging on to fat because I wasn't consuming enough calories
-My body was retaining fluid
-My posture made my lower belly protrude
-My body was reacting to stress and swelling in a primeval manner to protect my womb (!!!)


It wasn't until I read up on bloating being a symptom of ovarian cancer that I panicked and called Dr. Dad to express my fears. He listened to my symptoms and assured me of the unlikelihood of it being so, before going on to say "It sounds like it could be an allergy related to wheat. Try cutting it out for a while."






I couldn't believe my ears! I had never once had a problem with wheat in my life. I was practically raised on the stuff! It was impossible that my disgustingly healthy morning bowl of bran or lunchtime salad sandwich on soy and linseed bread could be the culprit. And wasn't "wheat allergy" just a nonsense thing that naturopaths told everyone was the source of their health woes? 


But I was desperate to have a flat stomach once again. I felt like I had deserved it, what with all the exercise I was doing. So I cut out the wheat. It was tough at first - as tough as the time I had to withdraw from cigarettes. I actually felt sad at restaurants when I had to wave away my beloved bread basket. A weekend breakfast without banana bread drizzled in butter felt like a punishment to me. 


But despite my perceived "loss", I experienced a significant, life-changing gain. My bloated belly and all the discomfort was gone! I stopped experiencing the frustrating constipation that had plagued me for years. I no longer felt tired after eating my lunch and even my face started to take on a different shape. I was used to waking up to a puffy face for years but hey presto - the puffiness also disappeared! Any time I have reintroduced wheat back into my diet, the bloating, discomfort and itchy eyes return. I've come to the conclusion that it just isn't good for me.


It comes as no surprise to me that medical doctors have begun to question the so called "goodness" of wholegrains such as wheat. Cardiologist William Davis has written a very interesting book called "Wheat Belly" in reference to the big bellies that people are carrying around today. He argues that the wheat we consume today is very different to the wheat our ancestors were consuming and that, along with increases in body fat, a multitude of health problems stem from wheat consumption. Some of his claims include:

  • Wheat raises blood sugar higher than nearly all other foods.
  • Wheat contains addictive compounds, leading to overeating and psychological addiction.
  • Wheat contains lectins, which are glycoproteins. Glycoproteins cause inflammation by disarming the proteins that line the intestinal tract that regulate which compounds are absorbed into the blood stream and which are not. This causes inflammatory compounds to enter the bloodstream. This process has been linked to rheumatoid arthritis, skin diseases like dermatitis herpetiformis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and a variety of other inflammatory diseases (source)
I'm tearing through this book at lightning speed and enjoying every minute of it. Davis presents a wide range of scientific and anecdotal evidence to illustrate his claims but presents it in a most easy-to-read, entertaining and humorous fashion. Though I think this book is incredibly valuable to the medical and nutrition fields, I'd highly recommend it to those interested in improving their own health or people who want to know a little more about what they are putting into their bodies. I hope you can get your hands on this one, folks...





69 comments:

  1. good post hun - i had the same issue so i cut down on the wheat and then slowly brought it back in and that seemed to work x

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    1. I have heard that this works for lots of people with allergies. I must admit, I have tried to bring it back in but I haven't ever felt as good as I do without it. I really have a taste for breads and pastries and wheat products and envy people who can eat it without any effects but with time my desire for it diminishes :-)
      Thanks for checking in!

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    2. Can you comment on what you changed your diet to? I am a guy having this same problem and all I think I've narrowed it down to possibly being too much wheat consumption (I usually eat whole grain bread for lunch and bran cereal for breakfast every day).

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  2. I gave up grains a year ago next week. I had spent the last 30 years over 200 pounds. The first week I lost 5 inches in my waist. I hadn't lost all that much weight, but the difference in my belly was amazing. Now, a year later, I'm nearly 60 pounds lighter. I'm off high blood pressure meds and two out of the three diabetes meds I was taking. My total cholesterol is way down and my HDL is where it should be for the first time ever. I' 57 years old and I have no more daily aches and pains -- something I thought was "normal" for my age. And, as with you, any time I've reintroduced grains back into my diet the bloating, constipation, and aches come back. Good for you that you discovered this so early in your life!

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    1. Well done, Kim! Thanks for sharing your incredibly inspiring story. You're living proof that you don't need to simply accept "age" as the reason for uncomfortable bodily symptoms and illness. The progress you made in just one year is commendable and I believe you can look forward to superior health as the years go on! Thanks for stopping by. Anna

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  3. I did a 2 week experiment without wheat and then re-introduced it thinking I had found the "culprit" and that all would be well in my world again...I've since learned that I am an all or nothing kind of gal and I am now actively pushing the wheat out of my diet. It's a challenge though, Dr. Davis isn't kidding when he calls it an opiate. It's pretty darn hard to kick!
    I wish you luck!
    -Desiree'
    Life with our Family

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    1. Oh goodness yes! I hear you there! I must admit I have had a few dreams involving crumbed goods when I was kicking the habit! I find the more wheat I ate, the more wheat I wanted. But it does get better with time, that's something you can look forward to. Your appetite for it diminishes considerably. Best of luck to you, Desiree.
      P.S. Lovely blog you have there!

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  4. good job... very well written... thanks for sharing!! it's an amazing book... makes lots of sense... sooo why NOT give up wheat?

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    1. Very true, but sometimes it's hard to accept that commonly used products could be bad for us. But the more we investigate, the more we know - it's good to know there's plenty of folk interested in asking the questions and putting it out there for consumers to think about :-)

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    2. Wheat is "commonly" used here and also our biggest export! Do you really think the government is excited about sharing the fact that wheat very bad for us? No...of course not. Too much money to be lost. Also, there is not enough food to support our population without wheat.. hence the reason it was developed. We are less healthy then 100 years ago..very sad. If you look at photo's of our great grand parents..you will notice that no one appears to be overweight!

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    3. Find a photograph of the book's author. That might cause to to question his position on wheat and belly. I am not a big wheat eater but the author of that book is one fat fellow. Either he doesn't follow his own advice or his advice isn't worth the price of a slice of bread.

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    4. I don't know if he's really THAT big. But I believe that in going wheat free you can save yourself a whole lot of health problems... as long as you don't start substituting wheat for other high carbohydrate or high calorie wheat-free foods.

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  5. It's not a novel;)......

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    1. Noted and corrected, Anonymous! Despite being a bookworm I have a terrible habit of using "novel" and "book" interchangeably. Shall. Never. Repeat.
      :-)

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  6. Read Wheat Belly and you will never eat wheat again! lol.

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    1. Haha I totally agree! It's a pretty powerful book!

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  7. I am going "wheat free" starting Monday, June 11... I have Type 2 diabetes, on insulin and just can't get my blood sugar numbers down. My question is what to eat for breakfast?? Any ideas would be great. I wake up at 6:30 get to work by 8, then eat breakfast at 9 am. Just the way I like to do it...
    Crystal

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    1. Hi Crystal,

      Thanks for stopping by! You might want to discuss dietary changes with your doctor before embarking upon them but there's plenty of wheat-free breakfast options you can try. Off the top of my head:

      You could opt for oatmeal or a wheat-free muesli. You could try making up your own version at home with dried fruits (not too many) , nuts and seeds and some cinnamon for flavour. I love muesli with some fresh berries/banana with milk or yoghurt.

      Full fat yoghurt generally contains less sugar than some of the fat-free versions so that might be something to think about but it's important to pay attention to the nutritional labels when choosing. Yoghurt is also very filling!

      If you are watching the carbs (even gluten-free living can be high carbohydrate which affects blood sugar) or if that seems too heavy then low sugar fruits and yoghurt or just yoghurt on its own is always a healthy way to start the day. Some people like to sprinkle chia or ground flaxseed on their cereals or yoghurts for extra fibre and nutrients (omega 3's, protein, to name a few). Adding fibre helps keep you full and maintains good digestion.

      You could also combine these ingredients for a filling and healthy smoothie. In the colder months, you can microwave stewed fruits (I think these are readily available in supermarkets) and have them with yoghurt - that's pretty delicious.

      Eggs are a good breakfast item and don't contain the sugars present in fruit etc. They can be used to make an omelette (experiment with vegetables and ham/bacon) or you can bring in some boiled eggs to work and have them on their own or with a slice of gluten-free bread.

      Some of these breads are higher in kilojoules than white bread but one or two slices a day in the morning might not hurt only if your carb intake isn't too high throughout the rest of the day. Your favourite spread on gluten free toast is an idea. Or maybe even microwave some beans!

      There are many gluten free cereals around, such as rice or corn type cerals but again, these are high in carbohydrates like wheat.

      There's lots of information online for wheat-free breakfast ideas but some of them require cooking so it might not be feasible at work. Some of these include pancakes or or bacon and egg type recipes. Other wheat free folk microwave their leftovers from the night before!

      Good luck to you, Crystal, please let me know how you go

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    2. PS. I might just add this in - it's from the wheat belly blog and might be of some use to you, again I would let your doctor know of any changes you are implementing in your life:

      http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2011/08/the-holy-grail-gluten-free-but-low-carb/

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  8. good morning,
    loved your article....i have a question~i gave up wheat one week ago, still new to this whole thing. i definitely feel better, bloating mostly gone and my stomach is def smaller. but have not lost one single pound!!! should i just stick to it enjoying the benefits i have found and pray the weight will start coming off?? love to hear your thoughts, have a great day

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  9. Hi Anonymous,

    First up: well done on breaking the wheat habit. It's a tough one to kick but it definitely pays off when you feel and look better so quickly after ditching it from your diet.
    It has only been one week, so I'd definitely recommend you don't get disheartened.

    Keep in mind that when people ditch wheat, they have a tendency to substitute their wheat intake with gluten-free carbohydrates. Sometimes these are higher in calories and carbohydrates than wheat.

    When we eat carbs, our bodies tend to try and burn these off first before burning into stored fat. So it's likely that if your carbohydrate intake is the same or higher, your body will maintain its current weight or even store the carbs you don't use, leading to weight gain.

    I find following a regime that is low in carbs works for me if I want to lose a few pounds. The great thing about this is that you can enjoy plenty of protein, which is filling and won't have you craving food as much as if you were eating a carb-heavy diet.

    I can't tell you exactly what will work for you as I don't know what your current calorie intake or exercise regime looks like but there are plenty of places online you can look at to calculate exactly what your energy intake should be if you want to shed the pounds. It takes into account your height, weight and activity levels and instructs you on the amount of calories you should consume to maintain or lose weight: http://www.freedieting.com/tools/calorie_calculator.htm

    Try to eat fresh as much as possible - eat plenty of vegetables and prepare as much of your food as possible at home - that way you know what you are putting in your body. I found when I ate out a lot I gained weight and I was surprised at how much excess fat and sugar goes into takeaway food. Don't get me started on alcohol!

    Fruits are good but some contain lots of sugar. In our modern diet many foods have far too much hidden sugars so we should moderate the amount of sugars (glucose, fructose) that we are consuming.

    Even "sugarfree" options can do funny things to our body - they contain no nutrients at all and can even affect health adversely so it's best to steer clear. On top of that, they can increase sugar cravings and cause us to overeat.

    Whoa - I realise how much I have written here. Perhaps I ought to do a blog post on weight loss!

    Good luck to you, I hope you achieve the results you are looking for and I am sure you will. Feel free to check in any time and let me know how you are going and if you have any questions!

    Anna x

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  10. I too over the last year started coming to the conclusion that my body did not agree with wheat or gluten. I went gluten free and when I would add it back in multiple things happened, one being major stomach aches and pains, diarrhea and vomitting. what?! I had eaten my whole life as well! Elisabeth Hasselbecks book as well as http://celiac-scoop.blogspot.com/ blog and talking with her on the phone and then talking to my doctor who said, how do you feel when you don't eat it, and when I said I feel really good, not so depressed feeling, not so bloated, more "regular" and more satisfied when I eat food, she said well then keep it out of your diet. The only thing that bugs me is I never had a real testing to say for sure, but my body has given me that answer pretty clearly. Thanks for sharing your story! I know it will bring knowledge to others who need it :)
    Kim
    www.myheartandyours.org
    www.glutenfreedaughter.blogspot.com

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    1. Hi Kim,

      Thanks for stopping by and for your website links - it's great to have such informative sites to draw upon.

      I think a really comprehensive blood test is something that couldn't hurt - some people are glad they went and did it because they can tailor the perfect eating plan for them. I haven't had one myself. Obviously with you and I (and countless others), the proof is there with wheat - you know how you feel both with and without it.

      I'm very interested in reading Elisabeth Hasselbecks book. Must get my hands on it!

      Anna

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  11. Does giving up wheat mean your going gluten free? I am trying to avoid wheat products and pasta. What substitutes can I use for these things?
    I don't think I have an allergy - just love them all and know I eat way to many but can't help it LOL! So, I decided to go cold turkey and eat protein, fruits and vegetables.
    Just starting out - thanks!

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    1. Hi Rachel,

      Gluten free diets cut out anything that contains gluten. Wheat is just one gluten-containing food. Other sources include rye, barley, malt, kamut, spelt tiritcale and certain food additives and thickeners. It's amazing how many products contain gluten! People who are gluten intolerant or have celiac disease will generally have to cut out all gluten-containing foods.

      Some people cannot tolerate wheat very well but might be able to tolerate other forms of gluten.
      There are wheat-free substitutes for most products. They might contain potato flour, tapioca, buckwheat, rice flour, almond meal... The list goes on. At my local store, there are gluten free pastas made using rice flours. I have eaten lasagnas made with rice pasta sheets and it was delicious!

      If you are concerned mostly about the excess carbohydrates in your diet, then it is probably wise to do as you are doing, in terms of going high protein etc.

      I find if I crave a nice piece of toast I can eat a gluten-free bread without any of the uncomfortable symptoms I get when I eat wheat breads.
      I think I can get "addicted" to carbs when I eat them regularly, but the less of them I eat, the less I crave them.

      There's lots of delicious, imaginative recipes out there for those who are going wheat free or even paleo and once you start searching and experimenting, you'll find that you have lots of options and don't miss the carbs in your diet!

      Let me know how you go cutting down on the wheat products!
      Anna x

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  12. I'm very intrested in all these comments, I went on the HCg diet for 1 month , about 2 years ago .I used the injections
    I did loose 30 pounds , but once I. Started back on regular food my life changed dramaticly ! Long story short over the past two years I had gall blader surgery costipation,and now I feel like I have IBS. I really feel like this whole thing my be that I'm wheat intolerant .I'm going to get this book and see if it will help. Thanks for the storie everyone

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  13. I went on the HCG diet through my doctor in September, 2011. At that time I weighed 305 pounds. I had migraines often - taking Excedrin or prescription meds daily. I suffered from constipation. I was always tired - I thought it was just from being morbidly obese. I lost 150 pounds on this diet - I have kept it off, too. I started the "re-introduce" phase and started to feel horrible. I didn't gain weight, but my pants didn't fit anymore. I started to have migraines. I felt HORRIBLE, even though I was exercising every day. So, on Monday I went off ALL processed foods again - which is mainly wheat. I am eating only fresh/frozen veggies and fruits, and lean proteins. I can handle fat, and even a little sugar, but carbs KILL me now. It took me several weeks to figure this out. I think I will be reading this book - I told everyone it's not a diet, it's a lifestyle. I firmly believe it, and I plan to stick with it! :-)

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  14. Note to Rachael
    AS I understand it, from a quick look I was allowed at Wheat Belly, It is not gluten itself that is of concern. It is only that coming from a certain brand of wheat, growing only a foot or so high, that is of concern. It was more economical to harvest so it replaced taller varieties. All other forms of gluten, including that from taller wheat, should be OK.

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    1. No, no, that's not true. Go to the Wheat Belly blog or the Wheat Belly Facebook page. Dr. Davis says NO gluten, NO wheat, and strongly suggests NO grains. He is really against processed "gluten-free" foods that substitute rice, tapioca, etc. for wheat. Check it out! Grain free!

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  15. Hi. I heard about this book on Fox News. The report certainly captured my interest. I am wondering if the book has recipes in it or can you recommend a good resource for gluten free recipes?

    Also, does the book talk about any relationship between ADHD and wheat?
    Thanks.

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  16. Hi Anon,

    Davis doesn't go into the relationship between ADHD and wheat so much but has been quoted as saying:

    "The gliadin protein of wheat has been modified by geneticists through their work to increase crop yield. This work, performed mostly in the 1970s, yielded a form of gliadin that is several amino acids different, and increases the appetite-stimulating properties of wheat. Modern wheat, a high-yield, semi-dwarf strain (not the 4 1/2-foot tall “amber waves of grain” everyone thinks of) is now, in effect, an appetite-stimulant that increases calorie intake 400 calories per day. This form of gliadin is also the likely explanation for the surge in behavioral struggles in children with autism and ADHD".

    As for recipes, I can recommend a few sites:

    http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

    http://glutenfreegirl.com/

    "Roost" is a fantastic blog (amazing photos and recipes) with a range of gluten free (and other allergen-free) recipes:

    http://www.roostblog.com/

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    1. THank you for all your insight on wheat free. I just need to know exactly what to eat and how much in order to lose weight. If I just pig out on protein 3 meals a day with some veggies, is that good. ?

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  17. I was surprised and somewhat comforted to find that there are so many people out there who had suffered similar health problems due to wheat. I had the same symptoms as you (bloated tummy, weight issues, itchy eyes, constipation, etc.) but never would have thought wheat was the problem until I've recently. Thank you so much for your post. I only started cutting out wheat products few days ago, but I already notice the improvements! Thanks!

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  18. My husband recently (mid-July)underwent heart bypass surgery and then got diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. I have previously read Dr Steven Gundry's 'Diet Evolution' and now my husband is reading it. My husband has stopped eating wheat products and is releasing weight dramatically.I have had a 'pot belly' for years despite having a very healthy diet. But now that I have just started cutting out wheat in my diet, my clothes have started to feel looser on me. I am now reading 'Wheat Belly' and find it fascinating (I am a health nut and have my own health blog). The part about LDL cholesterol and the difference that small and large particles make is amazing.

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  19. OK - I am new to all this but have been told that the ache in my hands - possibly arthritis - could be caused by too much Omega 6 from wheat. I am a brad addict but i am trying to cut out wheat - well as much as i can till i find substitutes. I have noticed that even after only a few days really cutting back on bread etc when I do have cereal (may contain wheat?) I feel bloated.
    I do not think I need a gluten free diet but want to know where I get get food ideas for a wheat free diet. I want to know what to shop for instead of wheat pasta, flour, sauce thickener etc.
    Would love help form anyone.

    Thanks

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    1. There's plenty of wheat free alternatives when it comes to cooking and most supermarkets are pretty good. I know my local grocery store has wheat-free pasta and gluten free flour (instead of wheat it may include potato flour, tapioca flour etc)
      I find it's pretty easy to substitute wheat noodles for rice noodles or just rice in most cooking.
      A fantastic wheat free lasanga I looooove is made with rice sheets rather than wheat lasagna sheets. In fact, I've had vegetarian lasagna that doesn't have anything but vegetables i.e the layers are made with eggplant, zucchini etc.
      For thickening stews I have heard of people using a starchy potato (which dissolves into the dish), grated onion or pureed beans.
      Definitely look up food sources of Omega 6 as wheat may not be the only culprit in your diet.
      Best of luck,
      Anna

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  20. I enjoyed your article. I, too, have experienced these effects. Just a note, you are a journalism grad working on your masters. "Despite having gained no weight and eating goddamn well" Why the curse word in an otherwise professional work? It may be stylish, but you do offend the sensibilities of a significant portion of your audience. Use the language, not the slang. As I said, just a note.

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  21. Thanks, Anonymous, for stopping by.
    While this blog is in absolutely no way a professional endeavour for me, I can see your point that using the word "goddamn" has the potential to offend some readers. It's a word that gets bandied around a lot and, for many, has taken on a less offensive meaning. But I do understand that some people may take issue with the word and, for that reason, I will be cautious of using this particular word in future.
    Thanks,
    Anna

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    1. I say keep the goddamn in your lexicon! Gives the article a sassy, conversational tone that I enjoy.

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    2. Anna you are being way too nice. this is your blog and you should be able to express yourself however you want.

      To the person that has an issue with the word "goddamn" lighten up, this is a blog, not a graduation assignment.

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  22. Can Wheat Belly be done by a vegetarian? I don't think I'm allergic to wheat but I am intrigued. Is this the 2012 version of the Atkin's Diet? Tammy

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    1. Hi Tammy,
      You can certainly go wheat free if you are vegetarian. I wouldn't consider this type of eating a "diet" as the Atkins is marketed because I believe people who suffer from the ill-effects of wheat would need to permanently avoid wheat in order to achieve or maintain good health. If you are concerned about limiting carbohydrates, if you replace wheat with non-wheat products that needn't be an issue. A lot of vegans and vegetarians I know are also gluten-free eaters and consider themselves to be in optimal health.
      Anna

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  23. Hi, I've been G F for eight days and feel like my constipation seven worse. How long did it take you to see an improvement?

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    1. Hi Anonymous,

      Is it possible that your fibre intake is lower now that you are not eating wheat? Certain wheat products actually added to my constipation but I did notice when I was eating high fibre wheat products such as bran, I wasn't so constipated.
      I would recommend you increase your intake of foods like oranges, kiwifruits or even flaxseed meal. Those are three things I swear by for regularity. I have also begun taking a probiotic in the mornings which is also very effective.
      Regular exercise (30 mins a day walking at minimum) is also great for fighting off constipation, as is drinking plenty of fluids.

      Anna

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    2. The docs say that wheat remains in your stomach for 2 months!... so it must be the time you take to get rid of the problems. I am also so bloated! It started about one and a half months since I quit it, and now I am close to have two months of quitting it. I hope it will go soon

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  24. Thank you so much for this post, Anna. Your list of theories are exactly mine! And with a history of Crohn's Disease and IBS, another theory for me is always just my proverbial weak guts. But I don't think that's it anymore because I'm doing very well; in fact it's a huge relief to consider that my body is just reacting to GMO wheat like any other would. At times I have gone gluten free when I was really ill, and in other times, seemed to tolerate "healthy whole grain" just fine. But I too, no matter how much I've been working out and eating well, feel thick in the middle and puffy. At 44 I chalked it up to changing metabolism, too. However, I went completely wheat free for two weeks and I noticed the change in my face too. My stomach was nearly concave, too. At a party this weekend I indulged in a big piece of carrot cake and had a raging headache the next day and felt down. I'm going to continue watching patterns... It's also encouraging to know that my attraction to low carb both because of how it makes me feel and the results I get isn't an unhealthy relationship with food. It's my intuitive self knowing what's best!

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  25. While reading the book I would say "WOW" every few pages. If you buy into what Dr. Davis writes (and I think I do) geneticaly modified wheat causes so many problems, everything from obesity, diabetes, heart disease, dementia, joint pain, to even hair loss. True. So is the government investigating and if not why not? I am angry and feel cheated and lied to. Why are we allowed to put things into our bodies that can do us so much harm. Everyone should read this book. If Dr. Davis is not telling the truth he would be getting sued into the stone age by wheat producers and wheat product manufacturers. Don't see that happening.

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  26. Hi there Anna,

    Great post.I was wondering if you could let me know if 'Wheat Belly' actually provides simple guidance about how to cut out wheat rather than just factual information.

    I'm tossing up just buying Davis' recipe book first based on the limited information I know.

    Thanks!

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  27. hello, i have a big supply of wheatberries and hope to purchase dr davis book, but wondering what his stand is on sprouted wheat--does he discuss it? is it acceptable or not? anyone knowing, please advise. thanks much.michellealeta

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  28. wondering if sprouted wheat is acceptable on dr davis diet! thanks

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    1. I don't think so, Anonymous. But I do believe that buckwheat and millet are acceptable grains for sprouting and use in cooking.

      Anna

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  29. I bought Dr. Davis' book (along with every other "diet" book out there) and stopped eating any wheat on Monday. Although I didn't do measurements (mostly because I was too embarrassed), as of today, I have lost 3 pounds! That's 1 pound per day! YAY!!! I didn't start exercising right away; I just wanted to try giving up the wheat for awhile without changing too much else in my routine and see what the results were. I think I'll start walking next week, and see if the weight loss increases. I, like so many others suffer from constipation or just an underactive bowel. I'm hoping that giving up wheat and eating more veggies will help in that area. I still crave wheat products, such as breads, bagels etc., but I think with the weight loss results, I'll keep this up for awhile! Can't hurt.

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    1. Well done, Anonymous!

      Soon you will not experience the cravings and will notice a huge difference in your bowel and other areas. Keep it up!

      Anna

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  30. I am male and, in college, was an amateur, albeit serious, runner. I typically logged in 30+ miles per week. I also ate super-healthy, or so I thought. Despite having great legs and a great upper body, my belly resembled an obese individual -- it didn't match the rest of my body. I noticed that my belly was biggest after I drank beer or ate cereal. As a result, I went on the Atkins diet and IMMEDIATELY the following occurred:

    1. Super-high sex drive.
    2. Longer, deeper sleep (I had mild insomnia till that point).
    3. Belly disappeared.
    4. Face became more defined, much sexier.
    5. IBS went away.

    I've come to realize, over the years, thru experimenting, that sugar/carbs aren't the culprit. It's wheat. I don't need doctors to corroborate what I've experienced and know to be true. FDA/Dept. of Agriculture and Washington D.C. generally are too beholden to powerful lobbies to give us the truth.

    One thing I've also learned is how wheat can creep its way into your body -- even though I cut out breads/pasta/etc., I still drank scotch for a while, which I've come to realize is just as bad. I know drink 100% tequila from the Agave plant. No wheat there.

    Can y'all corroborate that rice is OK?

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  31. First of all, Anon, well done on giving up wheat and the improvements it made to your life.
    Rice is a good alternative to wheat, yes. I tend not to eat too much carbs in general but if I must eat any, rice agrees with me much more than wheat. It doesn't tend to give people the immediate puffiness and discomfort wheat does BUT if you are watching your weight, it is best to keep servings small or not to eat it at all.

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  32. Thanks Anna. I stumbled across your blog while searching for Wheat Belly. I can't find the book in Australia but I will be buying it online. I have just decided to go off wheat to see if it helps my pot belly. I am the same as you I am so toned and thin everywhere else but can't get rid of the "pooch" My PT told me the other day it's the first thing he notices about me! Horrified! I recently did a blog post about it with pictures of my little pooch, somedays I feel so bloated and my stomach can make me look pregnant!

    Thanks for your input on the topic. I can't wait to read Wheat Belly.
    Lyn

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  33. I read these posts with interest. My husband found this for me after constantly hearing me complain about a big belly, bloating, discomfort and feeling crap just generally. I wonder whether wheat affects fertility? my fertility is bad too... been trying to have a child for 5 years, i wonder if there is a connection? will give it a go and we shall see what happens, mnay thanks

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  34. Is this something you just randomly developed? I've been eating wheat and grain products my whole life and never seem to have an issue. I'm a bodybuilder and my stomach is pretty flat when I get my bodyfat low. I can bloat when I eat things high in fiber though (broccoli, raisins, etc).

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  35. I have just been made aware of wheat belly. The first thing that I want to do is get tested for celiac as I have had problems for years and want to rule out the disease before I go wheat free and can not be tested. I am completely addicted to cake, etc., and i am also a mother of 3 kids in grade school. These 2 facts are going to make it very hard to cut wheat out completely. I believe the issues around genetically modified wheat, but wonder if it is possible to buy any of the ancestral varieties so that I can make my own bread, etc. People that have wheat issues seem to do fine in Europe - is it true that their grains have not been genetically modified?

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  36. Have nearly finished Wheat Belly--have been helping my granddaughter write a research paper on wheat and gluten intolerance. The book is great; and he has many examples among his own patients as well as from his own experience, to support his claims. It is interesting how some so-called "experts" will find something to complain about, such as here at http://huntgatherlove.com/content/wheat-belly. Oh well. Can't please them all. I'm just grateful to have the information. My daughter and granddaughter have had dramatic changes in their health after removing wheat products from their diet.

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  37. Anonymous, Nov 3 7:22PM: Yes, it can affect fertility. Go gluten-free. SecondOpinion.org had an episode about Celiac Disease; read the transcript. The patient had fertility issues.

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  38. Its very true! I love your post! I am experiencing the same problem you were having. My stomach bloats like a balloon! My face also gets bloated and red. I have emotional depression and anxiety when I eat wheat. Im not too fat, but when I bloat it makes me look like it. I gained 5 pounds because of my bloating, constantly. Right now, I'm cutting off all wheats and dairy products. Its really hard because everything you eat at restaurants have wheat including; fried chicken, hamburger buns, italian bread, and etc. Well, thanks for this post. :)

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  39. Hey,I had wheat belly too!, My stomach was always so bloated and every single day i had bad gas. This occurred for few months and then my stomach inside started to get an bad inch which was very strange, i cut out wheat and never had any symptoms of what i describe within 2 days. I bought the book wheat belly and its creepy how much GMO shit is out their to kill us lol. Also im lactose intolerant and every time i have yogurt which usually gives me bad gas, since i cut out wheat im not lactose intolrent anymore which was strange. Ive been tested by test and i was actually lactose intolerant now all of a sudden im not.. Tht GMO Stuff i swear is killing us

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  40. I hear noises the moment food drops in my stomach and I couldn't understand it. I one watched video (http://t.co/gLqFqWDBw2) which mentioned most of my symptoms. I also have burps. Does this things come with age? why do I need to change my diet because I was once fine.

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  41. tHE SAME THING WAS HAPPENING TO ME - THE BLOATING, FEELING JUST TERRIBLE AND STOPPED THE WHEAT AND INSTANTLY AN IMPROVEMENT - WHEN i TEST IT AND HAVE JUST 2 CRACKERS IMMEDIATELY i FEEL THE DISCOMFORT -NOW ANYTIME i SEE ANYTHING THAT HAS WHEAT IN IT
    i LOOK AT IT AS PURE EVIL - i LOVE THE wHEAT BELLEY BOOKS - THEY WERE A SAVIOUR
    i ENCOURAGE ANYONE OUT THERE TO TRY THIS AND YOU WILL FEEL BETTER !

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  42. hi Anna , I have cut wheat out almost 90 percent over the last 6/8 weeks and feel a different person...today i had cake and the grogginess and bloating hit me immediately......cake was lovely though lol

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  43. Hi there......... I too came across "Wheatbelly" by Dr Davis. After procrastinating a long while, I finally started my wheat freeness and I want to report that in the space of just over a week.... I have lost 5lbs and inches off my belly-waist. My clothes are definitely looser. I have slept better, feeling refreshed in the mornings. I am calmer by far than I was before being wheat free. I have had zero cravings for the wrong foods and no hunger whatsoever! This has surprised me the most, and pleasantly! Into my 2nd week and enjoying this whole change in my eating habits.......so glad I found out about it.

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